My Many Mysteries

I have a bad habit of sticking seeds and plant pieces in the pots of other plants.

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I tell myself I will remember this.  I will know what it is when it grows up.

I have done this too many times to keep track of what was stuck where.

So along with the designated plants in the pots, there are mystery plants.

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I find a pieces of a plant broken off.   Which plant?  What color?

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No matter.  Stick it here in this empty spot.

I have a habit of purloining seeds.

I spent a whole day with this piece of picked-off-the-tree citrus fruit in my bra.

I did not remember it until that night while changing into my pajamas.

I did manage to label those particular seeds.

Not that I wouldn’t recognize the mean little seedlings with their lethal thorns.

I have moved a “mystery tree” around the yard for years. I knew I must have had  a reason for planting it in the kids’ sandbox.

It finally bloomed this year.

It is a peach.  I now realize it was the pit of a long-ago snack eaten by one of my now-grown children.  Mystery solved.

While clearing out a box this morning, I found this.

Could it be a seed from a Tuscan pear?  We shall see.

FLOWER

 

Seeds in Sand

I am ashamed to admit that I usually don’t mix my small seeds with sand.

It can be seen on my hand how this mix would better space the seeds.

Poppy seeds are also tiny and tend to blow while sown.

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This leads to over-crowding and the need to thin seedlings.

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Sometimes I wait too late to thin, which disrupts the roots of the plants left.

Last week I mixed my poppy seeds with sand before sowing them.

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I liked that I could see where I had sown the seeds.

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Hopefully, this year’s poppies will be less crowded than last year’s crop.

If I have given you my red, double “Bill Troutman” poppy seeds; you need to sow them soon.   They are early risers.

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FLOWER

Seeds for Tomorrow

No matter how you feel today, you must plan for tomorrow.

Winter is coming.

Your plants know this.  They are setting seed.

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Hibiscus seed pod

What are you going to do?  Let them fall to the ground to rot or be eaten?

No. You are going out there and collect those seeds to save and share.

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Four O’clock seeds

There is no use buying the same type seeds next spring.  They may not be the exact hybrid.

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Flying Saucer seeds
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Flying Saucer Flower

It takes only minutes. Take envelopes with a marker.

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Butterfly Weeds pod
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Butterfly weed seeds

Write the name of the plant on an envelope and put a number of seeds in it.

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Bind weed
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Bind weed seeds

I take requests, so I save many seeds from some plants to share.

I even save weed seeds that I like to plant along my driveway.

Think forward, now that winter is coming.  Prepare for tomorrow.

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FLOWER’s seed bank. I will share.

Get ready gardeners.  Think spring!

FLOWER in the fall.

A SEED WITH A HEART

Last month my family spent three days down in South Carolina desperately searching for a nice place for my son to live.

Although I was intently hunting down a suitable dwelling, I did manage to stumble upon the vine of my dreams and snag some seeds.

I have been known to return from trips with acorns in my pockets and seeds in my wallet, but I did get permission this time.

The lovely vine was in that charming little town, Cheraw.  When I mention this town’s name to my North Carolina neighbors they recall passing through there on the way to the beach. You may recognize this building at the main square.

rabbits,Cheraw, Portland, Blog 1139

You folks need to stop in this town to stretch your legs from now on. It is a southern delight of lovely flowers, tasty food and nice people. We felt like old friends everywhere we went. I am a happy mama that my son is surrounded by good folks.

I took a picture of the vine of my dreams with my phone and rushed to the nearest open business, which happened to be the aforementioned, “Charmed by Cheraw” Chamber of Commerce.  This is where we found all the help we all needed.

The nice woman there handled my vine emergency while the nice man assisted my son with his housing emergency. She picked up the phone and called the garden club that plants the planters around town.

A member of the Cheraw Garden Club shared the name of the vine and gave me permission to purloin a few ripened pods containing seeds. A card had actually been attached with plant  information to the trellis, but it had fallen down. These are my kind of people!

Card posted with information attached to the vine.
Card posted with information attached to the vine.

So here it is my fellow garden enthusiaists.  The vine of my dreams in the phloem.

New vine. I am in love!
Cardiospermum helicacabum

It looks like a party on a trellis doesn’t it? It’s the combination of tiny white flowers and pods of various colors that reminds me of confetti.  It’s hither and slither growth adds to the explosion effect. What a happy little plant!

The species name is Cardiosperma helicacabum.  My guess is that the genus name refers to the black seeds that have a tiny white heart on each one. They look like love beads.

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The real punch in the line is the common name, Love in a Puff.  I am not making this up folks.

Before you rush to order it from Burpee,  I must alert my southern readers that my research warns that Cardiospermum  halicacabum may be an invasive, self-seeding annual in Southern zones of 6 and up.

I also read that this delightful plant has been around for two hundred years. Why am I just now finding out about it? Well the secret is out now!

I intend to handle my little seedlings with the same care as I have my other potential renegades… in a pot.

I’ll be sharing my progress with seed germination in April.  I do have quite a few seeds collected…legally of course.

FOLLOW the FLOWER!