Steadfast Spider has Spiderlings

Success for Mama Green Lynx/ Peucetia viridans.

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She has not left the eggs sac for weeks.

Today is has been ripped open and dozens of tiny spiderlings are out.

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She seems to have woven a web-playpen for the babies.

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She moves around the cluster of young ones tapping them with her lovely spiky legs.

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I feel privileged to have witnessed this.

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FLOWER is a happy grandma.

Spider in the Storm

Laugh if you wish.

I was concerned for my mama spider and her egg sac during last night’s storm.

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I have been watching them both for weeks. She is a Green Lynx spider/ Peucetia viridans.

I was attracted to the head of goldenrod blooms by a peculiar object among the yellow flowers.

I saw her egg sac before I spotted her guarding it.

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The color of the egg sac is a dull straw-brown, but the shape is intriguingly like a cut diamond.

It has a flat table top with crown  below it and pointed bottom,  like a culet.

How could a spider make such a complex shape?  I wonder the same about the intricacies of webs, also.

I have been waiting for the spiderlings to emerge, so that I can examine it more closely.

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The mama spider diligently guards this nest and puts her body over it when she senses my presence.

This morning I did get a better picture of the sac due to her dazed and soaking wet state when I approached.

She quickly assumed  her guard post when I touched the goldenrod.

I am so glad that she and her offspring are safe and sound after the wind and torrential rains.

I am considering staking the Goldenrod so that Mama Lynx will not have to hang like that.

I know I shouldn’t interfere, but we grandmothers are very protective.

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I am also afraid that “Mr. Flower” will cut it down with the weed-eater.  Oh my!  I’d better stake it now.

I’ll keep you up-dated about the hatching.

FLOWER