My Gran’s Magnolia

I got to wander around in my friend Sandra’s yard this weekend.

As I stood under her Magnolia tree I took a trip back in time, to my maternal grandparents’ yard.

Their home was on a hill looking at Hibriten Mountain.

At the drive was a huge Magnolia.

I played under that tree. I thought the blooms were magic.

Gran had a special vase just for a bloom.  I have it now.

The pods reminded me of bear’s claws.

My sister and I mentioned the tree to Gran while she was in a nursing home, near the end, basically unresponsive.

A tear rolled down her cheek.

I don’t know how to explain loving a tree or bush or flower,

but some of us really do.

FLOWER

 

12 thoughts on “My Gran’s Magnolia

  1. Cette fleur de Magnolia est de toute beauté avec tant de jolis détails. Je ne peux pas rester insensible devant tant de beauté que ce soit fleurs ou arbres. La nature est très belle 🙂
    Mes amitiés

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Lovely story! I believe some of us do love our plants, my husband says jokingly he wishes to be reincarnated as a plant in my garden 😀 – given how much attention and care I give them.

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  3. Lovely! My grandmother had a tiny, tiny garden but grew the most beautiful pink roses. We emigrated from Scotland when I was little and by the time I got back to see Gran she had moved and no longer had the roses, but we used to go for walks to see other people’s gardens. I think plants; natural things, have so much power to connect us with each other and with our past.

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  4. Great thanks for your story! No, we can’t explain this love for flowers, or maybe we can, but the thing is we do love them. I know that I love the pale purple lilacs because I saw them in my great grandmother’s garden when I was four. And I know I love the singing of the blackcap with a melancholy sadness because it sang outside the open window the night my wife died. It’s the purest love I know, our love for fragrances and sounds, and I feel our memories of these will be among the last to leave us. These – and our early memories of songs and ditties.
    Ellington

    Liked by 1 person

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