Jewel Dropping

One of the stars of August is this magical plant, Talinum paniculatum ‘Limon’.

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I do love its chartreuse leaves.

I love its tiny pink blooms.

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But its best feature is its seeds.

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That is why its common name is Jewels of Opar.

These little round seeds sparkle in the sunshine.

They also drop to the ground and germinate.

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So the jewels have dropped and scattered over the years.

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Those familiar chartreuse leaves show up wherever the plant was located last season

or in the pots of other plants next to the pots where they bloom.

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I do truly love this plant, jewel dropping and all!

FLOW

3 4 Pots

I have three plants that I do not intentionally let out of their pots.

All three have a reputation for going rogue if let loose.

I LOVE all three or I would never chance a release of a new “Kudzu” into my gardens.

I have not had the least bit of trouble with this first one,

Bleeding Heart vine/ Clerodendrum speciosum, thomsonia. 

I have taken cuttings and produced new plants, but it has never escaped on its own.

The second one is also a vine.

Love-in-a- Puff/ Cardiospermum halicacabum  produces puffy pods which contain round black seeds with a white heart on each.

After three years of having this plant, I have only found two escapees near to where the mama plant was the previous summer.

The last one however, Jewels of Opar/Talinum paniculatum has escaped many times.

I always dig up the seedlings and transplant them into pots.

This plant has a long root that may prove impossible to remove.

The beauty of its blooms and pods is what I find irresistible.

The “limon” leaves are edible, but I have yet to eat one.

(My husband has still not forgiven me for bringing some Crownvetch on the property nearly thirty years ago. We are still finding it.)

So these three are for pots, but worth the risk.

ROGUE FLOWER

 

In Love with a Bully

At my age, with my experience, I should know better.

There were signs early on, which I chose to ignore.

There was just something so irresistible about

its seeds.

That’s right, seeds. Those carmine-colored, tiny, shiny rubies.

Not the flowers, although they are a magical spray of tiny pink of blooms on wiry stems.

Nor the chartreuse leaves which give it the name ‘Limon.’

It was the tiny jewels of seeds.

Jewels of Opar ‘Limon’

Thus the name, ‘Jewels of Opar’  for this Talinum paniculatum/ Fameflower.

I should have suspected when little, lime green leaves appeared in neighboring pots.

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I should have realized its tenaciousness, when every cutting grew roots.

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It should have been a warning sign when even tiny cuttings produced flowers and seeds.

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I was blinded by those seeds.  Fall in love first, ask questions later.

Finally, I did some research.

Caution!  Self-sowing.  Deep tap root.  Eradication difficult.  Invasive.

These warnings are for Zones 10 through 15, I am in Zone 7.

I still will not be putting any in the ground or sharing my many new plants

until I see if our winters will kill back seeds and sprouts.

I did read that the leaves are edible and can be made into smoothies.

If this becomes a problem, I will eat my way out of it. That always works well.

Sometimes, I just can’t help myself.

The heart wants what the heart wants.  Bully or no.

FLOWER